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New Mandatory License Suspensions for Hit and Runs

Over the last year, there has been a push in the legislature to increase liability and punishment for drivers involved in hit-and-run in California.

In October of 2013, Assembly Bill 184 was passed, which provides an additional tool to law enforcement officers investigating hit-and-run offenses; giving officials more time to find and prosecute drivers who flee the scene of a crash.

Another bill is now making its way through the legislature that would require a minimum 6 month automatic license suspension for any driver who commits a hit and run, regardless of the severity of the accident, even those that do not result in injury.

Existing hit-and-run law requires a driver to stop at the nearest location that will not block traffic or otherwise jeopardize the safety of other drivers. However, Assembly Bill 1532 would require a driver to stop immediately at the scene of the accident.

Currently, most hit and run drivers involved in a non-injury accident are given probation and a fine, although law does allow for a person to be sentenced to up to a six months in jail. Under the new law, a person convicted would also face a mandatory license suspension from the DMV.

As of April 8, 2014, the bill is currently in front of the Assembly

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Blog

New Mandatory License Suspensions for Hit and Runs

Over the last year, there has been a push in the legislature to increase liability and punishment for drivers involved in hit-and-run in California.

In October of 2013, Assembly Bill 184 was passed, which provides an additional tool to law enforcement officers investigating hit-and-run offenses; giving officials more time to find and prosecute drivers who flee the scene of a crash.

Another bill is now making its way through the legislature that would require a minimum 6 month automatic license suspension for any driver who commits a hit and run, regardless of the severity of the accident, even those that do not result in injury.

Existing hit-and-run law requires a driver to stop at the nearest location that will not block traffic or otherwise jeopardize the safety of other drivers. However, Assembly Bill 1532 would require a driver to stop immediately at the scene of the accident.

Currently, most hit and run drivers involved in a non-injury accident are given probation and a fine, although law does allow for a person to be sentenced to up to a six months in jail. Under the new law, a person convicted would also face a mandatory license suspension from the DMV.

As of April 8, 2014, the bill is currently in front of the Assembly

EmailBookmark/FavoritesShare