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Freeway Signs & Radio Ads Urge Anonymous 911 DUI Tips to Police

911 Reports to Police in San Diego are becoming evermore boldly promoted via radio ads, public service announcements, billboards, digital freeway displays, and other media by way of well-funded grants and organizations. Among an ever increasing amount of anti-DUI campaigns, the California Office of Traffic Safety (OTS) has partnered with media giants such as CBS and Clear Channel Communications to promote the recent “CALL 911 Emergency & Report DUI!” crusade to spread awareness of suspicious impaired driving characteristics.

Governors Highway Safety Association

The GHSA’s San Diego campaign titled “Report Drunk Drivers – Call 911” is being publicized via graphic bus signs, tip sheets distributed by grocery stores, signs displayed on top of local taxi cabs, billboards, signs at the airport, radio and television announcements, nightclub and restaurant materials, and widely distributed web banner ads.

California Office of Traffic Safety

Not only does the California OTS recruit ordinary citizens to quasi-patrol the roadways looking for signs of drunk drivers, they publish a “tip sheet” for reporting DUI suspicions to the 911 Emergency System. In addition, The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) broadly promotes a program titled “Operation Extra Eyes” campaign, supported by a 148 page manual on “how to” implement tipster involved DUI enforcement.

First, a look at the California Office of Traffic Safety Tip Sheet and Frequently Asked Questions publications:

OTS 911 Tip Sheet:

The tip sheet begins with suggestions for spotting drunk drivers. Citizens are directed to be on the lookout for lane weaving or swerving, slow moving vehicles, failure to proceed upon a red light turning green (slow response), irregular braking, turn signals left on, night driving without headlights or with brights, wide turns, and straddling lane lines. Citizens are also advised to report aggressive driving behaviors such as speeding, tailgating, unsafe passing and multiple lane changes.

The OTS’ reasons for justifying a call to 911 aren’t limited to the behaviors listed above. In addition to driving patterns, the California Office of Traffic Safety summons the public to make an emergency report if they come accross a driver who is “staring straight ahead, face close to the windshield, and/or appears to be quite sleepy…”.

OTS

Freeway Signs & Radio Ads Urge Anonymous 911 DUI Tips to Police

911 Reports to Police in San Diego are becoming evermore boldly promoted via radio ads, public service announcements, billboards, digital freeway displays, and other media by way of well-funded grants and organizations. Among an ever increasing amount of anti-DUI campaigns, the California Office of Traffic Safety (OTS) has partnered with media giants such as CBS and Clear Channel Communications to promote the recent “CALL 911 Emergency & Report DUI!” crusade to spread awareness of suspicious impaired driving characteristics.

Governors Highway Safety Association

The GHSA’s San Diego campaign titled “Report Drunk Drivers – Call 911” is being publicized via graphic bus signs, tip sheets distributed by grocery stores, signs displayed on top of local taxi cabs, billboards, signs at the airport, radio and television announcements, nightclub and restaurant materials, and widely distributed web banner ads.

California Office of Traffic Safety

Not only does the California OTS recruit ordinary citizens to quasi-patrol the roadways looking for signs of drunk drivers, they publish a “tip sheet” for reporting DUI suspicions to the 911 Emergency System. In addition, The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) broadly promotes a program titled “Operation Extra Eyes” campaign, supported by a 148 page manual on “how to” implement tipster involved DUI enforcement.

First, a look at the California Office of Traffic Safety Tip Sheet and Frequently Asked Questions publications:

OTS 911 Tip Sheet:

The tip sheet begins with suggestions for spotting drunk drivers. Citizens are directed to be on the lookout for lane weaving or swerving, slow moving vehicles, failure to proceed upon a red light turning green (slow response), irregular braking, turn signals left on, night driving without headlights or with brights, wide turns, and straddling lane lines. Citizens are also advised to report aggressive driving behaviors such as speeding, tailgating, unsafe passing and multiple lane changes.

The OTS’ reasons for justifying a call to 911 aren’t limited to the behaviors listed above. In addition to driving patterns, the California Office of Traffic Safety summons the public to make an emergency report if they come accross a driver who is “staring straight ahead, face close to the windshield, and/or appears to be quite sleepy…”.

OTS